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's been polling and not only did he denounce george w. bush but those democrats who went for the radical regulation. he was very clear about that. and he's populous. what romney has recognized there is real pain out there and people want something done. if obama is more of the same, he's in trouble. >> eliot: look, mitt romney is appeal to go folks right now to folks whose logic is give me something different. the burden is on the president is to say yes but the something different that he's offering is the same george w. bush that was offered in the first place. he does not close the circle. i want to make this point. the adcdos who came out and said you have to raise taxes. does that puncture the balloon of the entirety of the logic of mitt romney. >> it may puncture it if you want to analyze this in logical terms. >> eliot: you're not saying logic is not in politics. >> i don't think it is right now. you may have fired an aide who wrote a speech like that. i think romney is quite wise not to. the banality of what he says is central. he does not want to spell out what he's going to say
the presidencies of bill clinton and george w. bush. dan balz of "the washington post" is author of a narrative of the 2008 campaign. and michael duffy of "time magazine" is author of a book about the world's most exclusive fraternity. the name of that book is "the presidents club." michael duffy as these presidents go from being campaigners to being presidents, how are they transformed? >> you know we asked a couple of the presidents who are still alive what they remember the big surprise or the big shock being when they finally stepped from being candidate into the oval office. and they say three things. one is the speed of the decisions come much faster. and unpredictably. they can't control the agenda. the second is, they're all hard. there are no easy ones and they all are fairly outspoken about just how difficult the choices are. basically there are downsides everywhere. and the third thing is that's a little more interesting. just because you make the decision doesn't mean anything happens. when ike took over from truman, truman said "poor ike, he'll think it's just like the army. do thi
obama you want to talk about george w. bush? that really for swing voters, undecided voters you want the image -- >> to remind them of hurricane katrina, bush? >> it's not effective surrogacy, apart -- forget about the harshness. >> romney was nastier to bush in the debate than obama was. >> by the way, jeb bush, the whole uniting at this time? jeb bush, maybe one of his -- >> craig fugate a republican would not work for george w. bush after katrina. but when obama called him he said yes because they were serious about professionalizing -- >> there's the door. >> two guys, governor bush and governor christie, both could run for flpresident in 2016, taking different approaches to the image they're putting forward in the last few days of the campaign. you know they both of them have been not totally sole on the notion that romney was going to win for most of the time. privately both -- >> is that what's happening? >> i think both of them are looking, to some extent, what comes next. i'm not saying they don't want governor romney to win this election but both skap ceptical his chances f
terms as wisconsin governor and was george w. bush's secretary of health and human services. she's 50, openly gay and a 14-year veteran of the house of representatives. up for grabs is the senate seat left open by retiring democrat herb cole which republicans desperately want to help them win a majority. >> i'm tommy thompson. >> reporter: both sides are pooring in cash, a state record $40 million has been spent so far on this election. almost three-fourths coming from groups that aren't directly associated with the candidates but are very interested in the outcome. >> you can't turn on your tv right now without running into ads for tammy and tommy. >> reporter: daniel bice has been covering wisconsin politics for more than 20 years. this race he says is all about attacking the opponent. >> she's trying to define thompson as someone who was a good governor but no longer supports the interests of wisconsin. >> tommy thompson, he's not for you anymore. >> he's trying to define her not as the nice tammy baldwin that you see on tv but as an extreme liberal who votes in a way people in wis
. >> peter brooks a deputy secretary of state under george w. bush, and nick burns, former undersecretary for political affairs on the democratic side. and republican. let me ask for reaction first, peter. to what the cia says happened? >> i'm not surprised of the bravery of these officers. these people have been at war for many years and the bravery is no surprise whatsoever. i'm sure they did what they felt they needed to do to protect their fellow colleagues as well as other americans, and i think we're deeply indebted to them. >>> eli lake from "the daily beast." he has done some fantastic reporting. saying that the state department never requested military backup the night of the benghazi attack. normally, that would be the responsibility of the ambassador. that would have fallen to the state department to make that decision and they could hear it in real time, does this surprise you? >> you know, erin, i have to say, as i said before, and as you know, i served not just in democratic administrations, but republican administrations, including for george w. bush, i really find it distu
disappointment that he hasn't been able to change the tone. george w. bush ran he was going to change the tone. everyone is always going to change the tone. the question is mitt romney promising by partisanship of it like lucy promising charlie brown she won't pull football? [laughter] >> yes, i think it is. i think that he has to nod to that there is no evidence he would govern in of bipartisan way to read george w. bush that is not elected president in my opinion but did not get a majority of the votes -- [applause] he ran that we as a compassionate conservative and you would have expected him to govern as a moderate and realize he presided over a very deeply divided country and instead he was one of the most radical presidents we've ever had, so i expect the same thing from mitt romney who is actually talked who is espousing more radical right policies than george w. bush ever did. like nixon and ronald reagan in certain ways looks like a moderate in terms of education mitt romney is very willing to slash all of that. >> romney brings up his massachusetts experience where he was in an overw
baker was secretary of state and white house chief of staff for george h.w. bush. treasury secretary and white house chief of staff for ronald reagan. and undersecretary of commerce for gerald ford. he joins us from houston. hello, mr. secretary. thank you for joining us. >> thank you, bret. delighted to be with you. >> bret: your sense ofthe election and the importance this time around. >> guest: i think we will see a fairly close election. i endorsed quite some time ago governor romney because i think he is best equipped to dig us out of our fiscal and economic hole that we're in, in this country. as you mentioned in the introduction i was fortunate enough to serve not only as secretary of state but secretary of the treasury. i can tell you that the most important thing about america has been throughout its history, its economy. we can't be strong militarily, diplomatically or in any other way, politically unless we are strong economically. we now have a debt to gdp that is out of sight. we got to figure out some way to deal with that. when he was governor of massachusetts, romney
in wisconsin. they have not flooded the zone here with the candidates the way george w. bush did in 2004. but we certainly expect a close and competitive election. >> bret: joe, back in ohio, you know a lot of people talk about enthusiasm. what are you seeing in the state of ohio enthusiasm wise? >> well, before the first debate, i thought that obama had almost put this election away. but he blew the first debate. it's hard to say how the hurricane impacted that. froze the race in place. there is less enthusiasm for obama this time for sure. romney has more than mccain had in 2008. >> bret: then in north carolina, what about the machine on both sides? >> we have had 1.4 million early voters. the obama organization never closed up shot from 2008. critical in north carolina. one thing that makes north carolina interesting is that it has the largest african-american population of any of the battleground states. >> bret: last word, craig. machine in wisconsin? >> yeah, well, wisconsin is the highest turn-out state of the battlegrounds and it's very organized, engaged mobilized state as we ha
know, george w. bush asked president his flyover of katrina got people very, very angry. in many ways, it hurt the republican party in 2008 along with the war in iraq and the economic crisis of '08, it was sort of the third horseman of the woes that w brought on the country that he didn't seem to care enough during the time of the katrina disaster. >> jennifer: you wrote about this in the great deluge. you wrote after katrina the gulf south region and the united states as a whole needed compassion. what it got instead was the incompetence of george w. bush who acted as though he were disinterested in a natural disaster in which there was no enemy to be found. bush's slow responses to the great deluge made americans ask if he was a bunker commander in chief. and many people would argue that he never recovered from that. would you agree? >> i agree and i was in new orleans when katrina hit. and i was flabbergasted. i mean he went on from crawford, texas to san diego and gave a speech about the navy and about
an economy that is still on the mend. >> i am certainly not going to defend george w. bush's debt. but now it is $16 trillion in the reach that point under obama. reductions in spending, there are reductions on the rate of growth. certainly for all the picking we do on greece and italy and spain, they have actually spent a little less year-over-year than they have before. the status came from, california, has managed to do a little bit, too. those are all steps in the right direction. we are only going to get there through cutting spending in the united states. 75% tax rates, history has shown, again and again, going back to the first deficit that hoover ran during the great depression when as history has forgotten, began the process of franklin roosevelt continuing deficit spending in order to take up the slack in aggregate demand. you never reduce your debt that way. the tax increases do not reduce the debt. the new money that comes in that is spent on new programs that get created, those programs perpetuate themselves and they require new spending and new borrowing. cutting spending is
in the business of what he does. now, tell us about george w. bush. i mean, you had to up -- tell me about what he is like and did you ever have any squabbles with the bush administration over coverage of things? >> we have certainly squabbles with the bush administration. now with george w. bush. i first met him down here in austin when he was governor and running for president. one of the traditions in a place like abc news is when you get into a presidential election year you invite all the candidates to come in and meet in an informal editorial meeting in new york, and then al gore who was vice president of the united states, but george w. bush's people said thank you very much. you contend austin. we flew down here. peter and i and some others flew down to interview george w. bush. my personal feelings always were he was very pleasant. he was very enjoyable to spend time with. very quick. i always felt the media underestimated his intelligence, certainly underestimated his political savvy. i was always very impressed. that said, particularly as we get into september 11th and wars in afghanist
for the george w. bush administration. she is now a fox news host. >> you can imagine if he said, as commander-in-chief, it is important for me to stay back here at the white house. just imagine everybody would have thought, wow, how responsible. >> once the president made a statement, i'm not sure what he should have done. >> democrat, eleanor holmes thornton represents the district of columbia. >> obvious sit in mourning for several days and not go about our daily business. >> septembers', secretary of state hillary clinton suggests the attack was a spontaneous attack about the antiis lamb video. >> there is no justification, none at all, for responding to this video with violence. >> white house press secretary jake carney explicitly blames the video the next day. >> these proprosts -- proe protests were in reaction to a video. we have no information to suggest it was preplanned attack. >> later that day, at the transfer of a ceremony at joint base andrews, clinton talks again about the video. >> we have seen rage and violence directed at american embassies over an awful, internet video tha
in a presidential campaign >> think of george w. bush, and campaigning for mitt romney. it would be all over the place. what is this former president doing campaigning? lou: think about what difference in history is if eisenhower is campaigning for nixon in 1960. >> exactly, and we have seen that our former presidents, maybe with the exception of jimmy carter, who every once in awhile stick a needle into somebody's back, but basically even carter hasn't gone and the campaign trail in favor of aristocratic and it. lou: a lot of journalists trying to catch up with anne klein reporting on the machinations of clinton, the secretary and her legal team trying to match your reporting. her role, the president's -- the former president's role in taking responsibility for benghazi, then stepping back from it, leaving her in a heightened, elevated, if you will, memory, at least, those who follow politics, but taking effectively no responsibility. the president's stepping forward. what is going on here? >> and the president was asked today, i believe, about this benghazi think. he said, as i said to my
-organized campaigns that we've seen in recent memory was the 2004 george w. bush campaign. karl rove engineered a very impressive, microtargeting effort, where they started to integrate people's consumer preferences with their voting data to try to more precise -- so instead of just saying, ok, we're going to target everyone that we know is, say, a latino woman, you can actually individually start to target people based on what kind of car they drive, or what kind of cereal they eat, or all kinds of little factors that the people know from, you know, when you fill out surveys or when you buy things, that kind of thing. the obama campaign did that even more impressively in 2008, and they've been building on that ever since. so they've built a really formidable sort of digital, integrated data-targeting effort, that they then have put together with this vast network of field offices on the ground and neighborhood teams and volunteers and through facebook and everything else, so they know practically who all of their voters are, the millions and millions of people that they expect or hope they can drive
in libya, which is very unusual remark okay, so would you have reported the iraq war if george w. bush had picked the right side. >> was a reason beyond,. >> it was very clear that the people of iraq want to overthrow their leader. and you had hoped to do it. and he went to the u.n. to get that help. >> it was much more precarious situation. if you have a situation where the vast majority of the people and you had u.n. backing and there is no way it could be the u.s. alone, imperialistic attack to try to scoop up resources for yourself. >> hearing the talk, i have seen this movie before. saying that they will pick legitimate people within the country to do that -- tom friedman back it up, please. i saw. i saw the first time. you guys were all in school at the time. let's just let things happen the way they are going to happen. what other people worry about their own country. we have not problems in this country. >> jim, did you have anything to say? >> yes, i do have one question i can ask, it was george w. bush who wanted to do the libyan intervention, would you have supported it then? >>
1992 phenomenon that has changed that. he one the state twice. in 2000 it went to george w. bush. kerrey., john care the president got a nine point victory in 2008. we really are tossups state. the polls go back and forth. it is difficult to determine who is going to win this state right now. host: is there early voting and how do the hampshire residents vote on election day? guest: there's not early voting, but there's absentee ballot. you have to sign a form saying you are not going to be available on voting day to come to the polls. traditionally, the polls are open from about 7:00 until 7:00. some locations are open until 8:00 p.m. on election day. we have one of the highest voter turnouts in the country. other statistical interesting facts are that we are one of the least taxed states in the nation. the least. we have no income tax, no sales tax. the democratic and republican candidates will pledge on that issue, saying they will not have an income tax or sales tax. our two gubernatorial candidates right now are both running on that issue. host: neil levesque, about the reco
and takes the applaud and beatings for it, was created by george w. bush voted in october and december. it was taken over by obama in the meantime. the a bomb administration picking up for bush came up with a deal to save three companies, general motors, chrysler and delphi. what is delphi? delphi is the old telco auto parts division of gm. you know delco batteries. we had gm that desperate to cut off its own parts and set off delphi as a separate company which immediately pretty quickly went bankrupt. well, down went the vulture's and they pick.delphi corp. out of bankruptcy court for 67 cents, a darned good deal for the entire auto parts division of general motors. 67 cents a share. within two years they flipped it. they went public at $22 a share. share. that is it 3200% prophet that they weren't done. they weren't done. delphi had 29 plans in the u.s. and the delphi group sold it back to gm and the rest, every single plant was sold, was sent off to china. every single uaw job, everyone, 25,200 uaw workers including -- i got a call from michael moore. his dad had the delphi plant an
with some of the language and so forth and back away but he was pretty close to george w. bush. president bush felt that billy graham made a tremendous difference in his life in a personal way in terms of his faith in helping rescue his life. i think he was pretty close to president george w. bush, as well. is not spoken a lot in terms of campaign literature but i think there has been some issues out there among evangelicals and some skepticism about governor romney's mormon faith and i think billy graham's blessing is an important signal that it is ok to vote for a mormon. there have been full page ads and so forth. i think that is a very important thing in terms of the romney folks for billy graham to give that signal. host:rob christensen is with us. he is talking to us from raleigh and you can read more of his writings at news observer.com. we want to get more input and conversation going with some of our viewers and listeners. in order to do that, pick up the phone or send us a message -- we have a special line for folks calling from north carolina -- you can also send us e-mails --
.t. revolution and a shift in policies under the clinton and george w. bush administrations. from washington, this is one hour and 25 minutes. >> welcome, everybody. i am simon rosenberg. we are grateful that you came out here today. if we had done an event around polling we would have a few more people, but we are lucky to have joining rob shapiro, the chair of our globalization initiative, our good friend edward luce, who is now the former bureau chief of "the financial times," now chief american commentator and is also a published author. he has recently written one of the more influential or at least highly commentated -- there was so much commentary around his book about whether or not america was in decline in the economic issues we will be talking about today and we feel lucky he took time out of his busy schedule to guide us. many of you know rob shapiro, who has a long history of policy leadership here in washington, starting in the early days working for daniel patrick moynihan, to helping advise bill clinton in 1992, and eventually becoming the undersecretary of commerce in the se
. first let's take you back to 2000. that year george w. bush won independents 47-45. and independents made up a little more than a quarter of the electorate that year. in 2004, john kerry essentially split them with president bush, 49-48 with the independent share still only one out of every four voters. by 2008, independents accounted for nearly a third, 29%, and they broke significantly for president obama. he beat john mccain among them 52-44%. but the latest nbc news/"wall street journal" poll finds romney leading nationally by six points. why is that important in virginia? according to the new "washington post" poll, 36% of virginia voters now say they are independent, more than democrats, more than republicans. that's the largest voting bloc. let's look at the 2008 map to see where the president did well and where he needs to overperform this time. if you look here, i'm going to circle our little blue counties here. i'm going to show you where the places here, and i switch over to the 2004, you'll see all this blue disappear in the areas that i just circled. and when you look, y
than under george w. bush in eight years? >> yes. >> and mitt romney wants to take us back. so i can't even envision a romney presidency, but you're absolutely right. the supreme court is critical. everything that, you know, our constitution protects for us is at stake. >> let me bring in karen here. karen, i know that part of what president obama has done so beautifully is to make this argument that senator boxer is making there, the reproductive rights are economic rights, they are pocket book issues. >> that's absolutely right. i serve on the board of pro choice america. one of the things i know, the senator knows this, we found out about a year ago and gallup found it as women, ell, in battleground states, high percent sage of women, access to abortion care is higher than the economy, higher than jobs because women understand, again, that if you don't have access to birth control, if you don't have access to abortion care, those are sort of gate issues to other things. that means -- they pacts your ability to work outside the home, to care for your family. and the president has -
term of george w. bush. would you agree with that line of attack has not worked? >> not only do i not agree with that line of aattack. look at conversations we're having. listen to what voters tell us. look at ohio where the fact mitt romney was against the auto bailout, that mitt romney writes an article and says let detroit go interrupt, that's a severely conservative position. the fact mitt romney said he wanted to see roe vs. wade overternove overturned, that's a seriously conservative position. the fact that is they're severely conservative and far away from where the majority of the american people are. it's very important in this campaign that people understand their choices. >> bill clinton, obviously, very important to shore up the base. let's talk about the impact of hurricane sandy. do you agree that it could hurt the democrats more? that the obama campaign has depended so much on the ground game, and if that gets disrupted in some of these key states, it would be a disadvantage more to the president than it would be to romney "nightly newmitt romn? >> i will say the ob
, -- george w. bush, he won. >> it is not necessarily at the presidential level. indiana, the senate candidate richard murdock look like he was slightly ahead of democrat joe donelly going into the final debate between the two men last monday. in that debate, murdoch made some comments about rape that were taken -- able to be used in the democratic campaign ad. those comments have dominated political coverage for the last couple of days. it has sunk his poll lead. donnelly lead in the race according to internal polls. >> will take you live for to the get out the vote event. >> the future of our country right there. this looks like from the-ryan compan -- romney-ryan country. this is how i look at it. six more days to avoid four more years. you agree with me? i will go along with that. we need him now. it is the fourth quarter. the score is tied. we're in the red zone. the momentum is our way and you can see from this crash -- this crowd. are we going to take mitt over the goal line? of course we are. we will leave from on the field. those of you who were at football practice in your younger da
. with representatives from the administrations of george h. w. bush through the current administration of barack obama, our guest speakers today offer their expertise and experience as a look back on the use of service and look forward to the future of u.s.-asia relations. wish to offer my gratitude to georgetown's asian studies program, our school of foreign service, and the korea economic institute who have partnered to bring together some of our countries most respected minds on foreign policy and asia. we are deeply grateful to doctor victor cha a professor in government and asian studies and director of asian studies here in georgetown. carol lancaster, our dean of the school of foreign service, and doctor abraham kim, the interim president of the korea economic institute, for making this event possible. were also aren't up with is representative of the department of education, and we thank the department for its recognition of our asian studies program title vi, national resources center for east asia. it's fitting we gather today for this conversation just days before the presidential election.
with representatives from the administration of george h.w. bush to the current administration of barack obama, our guest speakers today offered their expertise and experience as they look back on their years of service and look forward to the future of u.s.-asia relations. we offer my gratitude to georgetown's asian studies program, our school foreign service and the korea economic institute who have partnered to bring together some of our country's most respected minds on foreign policy and asia. we are deeply grateful to dr. dr. victor cha and director of asian studies here at georgetown. dean carol lancaster dean of the foreign service and dr. abraham kim, the interim president of the korea economic institute her make in this event possible. we are also unsure what this representative of education and we think the department for its recognition of version studies program as title vi national resource center for east asia. it is fitting that we gather today for this conversation just days before the presidential election. the topic of our discussion will take on increasing importance for our pre
phenomenon that has changed that. he one the state twice. in 2000 it went to george w. bush. kerrey., john care the president got a nine point victory in 2008. we really are tossups state. the polls go back and forth. it is difficult to determine who is going to win this state right now. host: is there early voting and how do the hampshire residents vote on election day? guest: there's not early voting, but there's absentee ballot. you have to sign a form saying you are not going to be available on voting day to come to the polls. traditionally, the polls are open from about 7:00 until 7:00. some locations are open until 8:00 p.m. on election day. we have one of the highest voter turnouts in the country. other statistical interesting facts are that we are one of the least taxed states in the nation. the least. we have no income tax, no sales tax. the democratic and republican candidates will pledge on that issue, saying they will not have an income tax or sales tax. our two gubernatorial candidates right now are both running on that issue. host: neil levesque, about the recount laws in the
organized campaigns that we've seen in recent memory was the 2004 george w. bush campaign. karl rove engineered a very impressive microtargeting effort, where they started to integrate people's consumer preferences, with their voting data, to try to more precise, so instead of just saying ok, we're going to target everyone that we know is, say, you know, a latino woman, you can actually individually start to target people based on what kind of car they drive or what kind of cereal they eat, all kind factors from when you fill out surveys or that kind of thing. the obama campaign did that even more impressive in 2008 and they've been building on that ever since, so they've built a formidable, digital integrated data targeting effort that they have put together with this vast network of field offices on the ground, and neighborhood teams and volunteers and through facebook and everything else. so they know practically who all of their voters are. the millions and millions of people that they expect or hope they can drive out to the polls to vote for obama. >> molly ball is a staff writ
be responsive. >> thank you. >> eli lake, newsweek magazine. >> it has been recorded george w. bush tapped you or once you to be the fema director when you were in florida after mike brown. is that true, and to you write your own -- do you write your own tweets? >> yes, that is why there is this piping's. as far as the rest of this that goes, i work for the present right now, and that is my focus. what happened previously, we can talk about that later offline. >> thank you. >> next question. wall street journal, your line is open. >> i wanted to ask whether there is a consolidated effort on how many people are being told to evacuate or have evaporated, and a number of states that would involve. the second question on the coastal storm surges. if you could share more perspective on how long this could last, and a bit of historical perspective on whether -- when was the last time we have those kinds of potential storm surges over such a large swath of scocoast line? >> i do not have that in front of me. each state has been doing their own evacuations. we have been looking at what they would need
says we need. $25 trillion tax cuts would make president george w. bush look like a banker. he must have been asleep at the switch. you said like jerry mcguire "show me the money." you are the business guy. see me back after the election. who can take you seriously? here is my budget although it is not. see me about it after the election. the reason is there are only three options. if you want to repeal tax exemptions you have to cut the tax exemptions on the middle- class and governor romney says he will raise those taxes. or you can do what they have always done in just let the deficit explode again. when the economy goes it'll be a problem. or you could just gut the federal budget. gut funding for education. gut the student loan program. i spent $3 billion of your money to separate the human genome. he know how much economic activity it has generated? $790 billion. barack obama wants to raise it. they want to cut its. one thing they have not disavowed is they intend to cut medicaid by 33% over 10 years and get back to the state of ohio. medicaid provides medical coverage to lower
it is compared with 2004 when george w. bush won the state. you can see that president bush won more of the tidewater region than did john mccain in 2008. if you were president obama and you were mitt romney, where would you focus your resources, larry? guest: you can tell by where they are visiting. romney spends a lot of time in the richmond area. he needs a big vote out of those localities, some of which voted for president obama. other various conservative localities like chesterfield county went as high as 45% for president obama in 2008. there's no way for republicans to win statewide and allow centreville to get 45% of the votes to obama. they're both campaigning in northern virginia. it is the linchpin of a statewide victory for president obama. he needs to do well in the big, growing burgeoning prince george county and loudoun county, as well as fairfax. yes, the two areas are small, but trees and rocks and acres don't vote, at least in most states and localities. host: what kind of the voting system is used in virginia? guest: the computerized systems are used almost everyw
reaches its apex, president george w. bush not out campaigning for mitt romney. but rather speaking at an investment conference in the cayman islands. organizers declined comment. tickets, $4,000 apiece. >> oh, my goodness. >> sir richard branson said to be there as well. >> there you go. "the charleston daily mail." west virginia still feeling impacts of sandy in the form of snow. in some counties, 80% of residents have no power. and in places three feet of snow cover the ground. this must be just unbelievable. forest crews and fema have been working around the clock with chain saws to carve up fallen trees but more are falling under wet, heavy snow. >> "the washington post," the ipad mini goes on sale. apple expects to sell 1 million this weekend. put that in perspective, apple sold 5 million units of the iphone 5 in september. almost two inches smaller than the full-size version, but 330 bucks more expensive than competitors' model. >> 200 in the first day just to halperin. >> halperin. he hoards apple products. he's a hoarder. >> you never know. >> mika, we should point out one
in the tidewater region. you can see it is compared with 2004 when george w. bush won the state. you can see that president bush won more of the tidewater region than did john mccain in 2008. if you were president obama and you were mitt romney, where would you focus your resources, larry? guest: you can tell by where they are visiting. romney spends a lot of time in the richmond area. he needs a big vote out of those localities, some of which voted for president obama. other various conservative localities like chesterfield county went as high as 45% for president obama in 2008. there's no way for republicans to win statewide and allow centreville to get 45% of the votes to obama. they're both campaigning in northern virginia. it is the linchpin of a statewide victory for president obama. he needs to do well in the big, growing burgeoning prince george county and loudoun county, as well as fairfax. yes, the two areas are small, but trees and rocks and acres don't vote, at least in most states and localities. host: what kind of the voting system is used in virginia? guest: the computerized s
advisor to george w. bush. nice to see you long time. doing well. you're going to help us look at the electoral college and we hear it's about ohio can't make it to the white house without winning ohio. >> there are other ways, but in order to get to ohio first, you have to get to three and then two. the three states that you have to get to before you get to ohio are florida, north carolina, and-- are indiana, north carolina and virginia, three historically republican states that president obama won and then you've got to win florida, which has 29 electoral college votes, you get those four states, indiana nobody considers to be a battle ground, if romney gets the three states, florida, north carolina, virginia, then he's set up for, you know, going to ohio, those three states look pretty good. north carolina out of contention, florida looks pretty good. you know, florida four years ago, they had the ballot requests four years ago in florida, the democrats had a 7 point advantage, 45% of the absentee ballot requests, 37 for republicans-- 46-37. this time the republicans have a
in the obama administration, but that's a program that was really begun under george w. bush who increased it tremendously then. there's kind after bipartisan consensus that is increasing a certain amount of dependency on government. >> steve: and it has to do with the economic circumstances we find ourselves in right now. look at skyrocketing people who are suddenly on disability simply because, many surmise, they've run out of government benefits and only way they can get money back in the kitty. >> well, republicans are worried probably more about the increase in welfare spending i don't know what is warranted by the economic down turn because clearly, with what happened to the economy in 2009, 2010, a lot more people than usual were going to need some economic assistance from the government. no doubt about that. but the problem is, is that the spending has increased beyond that at a higher, greater pace than what would have been warranted just by our hard times. >> clayton: byron york, always good to see you on the show. we thank you for getting up with us on a sunday. >> thank you, gu
/11 victims to trumpet the george w. bush political agenda. that is wrong. it a fended -- offended many of the survivors and first responders, and i felt i needed to stand up. >> moderator: governor? thompson: i never questioned her pate lottism, i -- patriotism, i questioned her judgment. every person from wisconsin voted for it, including nancy pelosi. everybody voted for it except 22 individuals. 95% voted for it. it bothers me because i was there helping out. and if you talk to george pataki and mayor giuliani, they said i was a force of nature because i was up there so often helping people get things. and congress didn't give the appropriation she's talking about from things, people didn't get it. that's true, they didn't. but it wasn't because we didn't try. the federal government -- she's the congress, they didn't appropriate the money. that's why they didn't get the treatment they did. plus, they put a restriction in as to who could get it. we had to interpret the federal law. if we could have given more money out to more people, we would have. and talking about her judgment, no
to george w. bush, but in 2004 went to john kerry. the president had a nine-point victory in 2008. we really are a tossup state. the polls go back and forth. it is difficult to determine who is going to win this state right now. host: is their early voting? how do new hampshire residents vote on election day? guest: there are absentee ballots. you have to sign a form that says you not be available on voting day to come to the polls. traditionally, they are open from 7:00 until 7:00. some are open until 8:00 p.m. on election day. we have one of the highest voter turnout in the country. other statistical interesting statistics -- statistical facts are that we are one of the least taxed state in the nation. the least taxed state. we have no income tax, no sales tax. both the democrat and republican candidates will campaign on that issue, pledging that they will not have an income tax or sales tax. are gubernatorial candidates right now are both running on that issue, as a matter of fact. host: talk about the recount laws in the state of new hampshire. what are the rules for that? guest: we have
, george w. bush got a lot of criticism katrina, doing a heck after job brownie, the idea it appeared everything was going along smoothly. we learned days after the fact that there were bodies being discovered and great discord, and bad communication, help wasn't getting readily available and power outages were much more than we were told. and this idea where they're slapping each other on the back and commending themselves for a great job it's going to come back and bite their hineys. >> i think you're right about being a sleeper issue and why the president has been at fema this morning when he's gotday. quickly yesterday on our program we took a look at monthly unemployment number and it actually notched up one tick to almost 8% it's at 7.9%, is it too late for this to impact the election? >> i think it was kind of stating the obvious, if the number been a lot worse than people were thinking or better than people were thinking maybe it would have moved the meter a little bit. i don't know if this one does, i think essentially what we're looking at is, you know, flat employment throu
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